Dolphins Cheerleader Finals – Individual Perfomances

Amy - Part two of the Miami Dolphins Cheerleaders featured solo performances by each of the 79 finalists.

Amy - Part two of the Miami Dolphins Cheerleaders featured solo performances by each of the 79 finalists.

Courtney - Hopefuls dazzled the crowd with a dizzying array of costumes and outfits.

Courtney - Hopefuls dazzled the crowd with a dizzying array of costumes and outfits.

Tatiana - And they danced (or sang) in almost every style: Jazz, Lyrical, Rock, Tap. You name it; they danced it.

Tatiana - And they danced (or sang) in almost every style: Jazz, Lyrical, Rock, Tap. You name it; they danced it.

Jessica - There were batons...

Jessica - There were batons...

Nicole - and hats...

Nicole - and hats...

and splits!

and splits!


[Dolphins Cheerleaders Finals Gallery]

Video: ChivaGirls Work It

My peeps the ChivaGirls absolutely killed it during this halftime performance. They were 21 strong, with all 19 members of the team, plus choreographer Tim Stevenson and Laura, their coach. (Laura “thought” she retired after last season, but has found herself stepping in as an alternate more games than not. Homegirl’s still got it.)
So proud of them. Check it out!

[Click here] for more photos from the game.

Milwaukee’s AFL fans “pull for” their talented Fillies Dance Team

How could the Fillies possibly end up winning a tug o' war against burly firemen and policemen?

In their AFL game against the Georgia Force, the Milwaukee Mustangs could not pull out the win in a dramatic finish, after twice holding 21-point leads. However, their dance team, the Fillies, on the field as vast underdogs in their competition at halftime, pulled out a victory of their own, literally.

But that was just one component of their activity that night. Think the Mustangs rely on their Fillies Dance Team? Well, during the May 18th home game against the Georgia Force at the Bradley Center, as gates opened, the pre-game advertised promotion was Fillies poster autographs. At halftime, the Fillies not only performed but also participated in tug o’ wars against firemen and policemen, and at the end of the night, the Fillies were signing autographs during post-game when the fans are able to visit the turf. All this surrounding a game filled with routines and being part of the game break entertainment, you can see that the Fillies are one visible squad on game day.

Fans entered the Bradley Center and had a really tough decision: which table of Fillies should they start their autographs? It was Military Night, so veterans, current military members, and their families were prominent among the entering fans.

Fans such as Staff Sergeant Jim Lentz and his son John were part of Military Night

Soon, it was time for the Fillies to return to the locker room for a little pre-game prep. In a city that features a Harley-Davidson Museum, it was natural that right outside the locker room, motorcycles and one different type of Mustang, awaited to drive that the Fillies onto the field for pre-game introductions.

Fillies Megan and Allison in the sidecar, plus Melissa riding along, all get ready to ride out for player introductions

Amanda and the Fillies line up during pre-game introductions


Continue reading Milwaukee’s AFL fans “pull for” their talented Fillies Dance Team

MVC Swimsuit Cover Voting – Week #2

Voting continiues. This week, it’s Pam vs. Kaylee

Click here to vote!

Red Rocker Auditions Coming in June

Visit the Red Rockers page on the Washington Capitals website
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NYJ Flight Crew – Semi-Finals

Day 2 of Flight Crew Auditions saw 100+ dancers back on the Lexus Level of MetLife Stadium

Day 2 of Flight Crew Auditions saw 100+ dancers back on the Lexus Level of MetLife Stadium

Dancers performed a routine they learned earlier that day...

Dancers performed a routine they learned earlier that day...

... and a kickline, too.

... and a kickline, too.

Semi-Finalists were also asked to show off their splits.

Semi-Finalists were also asked to show off their splits.

Krystal is a former NJ Devils Dancer

Krystal is a former NJ Devils Dancer

Continue reading NYJ Flight Crew – Semi-Finals

Eagles Cheerleaders Finals

Eagles Cheerleaders Finals were held at the Kimmel Center back in April

Eagles Cheerleaders Finals were held at the Kimmel Center back in April

Friends and Family turned out to support their favorites.

Friends and Family turned out to support their favorites.

The night began with the each dancer in a bikini.

The night began with the each dancer in a bikini.

Then they performed a rehearsed routine in groups of three.

Then they performed a rehearsed routine in groups of three.

Without a doubt, the most terrifying portion of the entire audition process is the interview question.

Without a doubt, the most terrifying portion of the entire audition process is the interview question.

Hopefuls have no idea what  the judges might ask of them. So the spend the days preceding the finals imagining all possible questions and suitable answers.

Hopefuls have no idea what the judges might ask of them. So the spend the days preceding the finals imagining all possible questions and suitable answers.

Dani decided to retire as she has a lot going on. She got married this past year and is working on her master's degree.

Dani decided to retire as she has a lot going on. She got married this past year and is working on her master's degree.

[Eagles Cheerleaders Finals Gallery]

SI.com: Sixers Dancers

Click here to check out photos of the Sixers Dancers in action.

Former Dolphins Cheerleader takes Costume Shop to next level

Theatrics moves costume collection to Boynton warehouse
Mike Rothman
SunSentinel.com
May 23, 2012

If it involves the need for an authentic costume, Theatrics is the place.

Recently relocated from Lake Worth to Boynton Beach at 3461 High Ridge Road, Theatrics is the brainchild of owner Angel Wrona, who after being in theater all her life, decided to open a costume shop.

The 3,100-square-foot warehouse rents costumes to local plays, movie sets and even the occasional party goer looking for the real deal.

“We are one of the only places in Palm Beach County that rents costumes still,” she said of the year-round store. “Whether people are going to an event or there is a production, we are it.”

Schools in the area have also come calling on Theatrics and its original costumes. Atlantic High School in Delray Beach and Wellington High School have used the costumes for plays and events.

“Our name is getting out there,” Wrona said. “The costumes all depend on the event. Nothing trendy like Party City.”

For example, Wrona said a group came in last week looking for real cowboys and Indians garb.

The rentals start at three days to one week for a flat fee. Intricate, velvet-laced attire can run up to $100 for the rental but for a regular costume like a toga, it costs only $40.

“That’s not just a piece of cloth either,” she said. “That’s trimmed layers and the works.”

The store’s website, theatricslakeworth.com, has a Wall of Fame with pics of former customers happily wearing the costumes, including bunny rabbits, police officers and cats.

“I was raised as a theatrical ballet dancer, then came to Florida,” she said. “I am a Miami Dolphins Cheerleader alumni and former dance captain.”

In her performing days, Wrona always liked to make her own costumes.

She had the help of her husband Steve Echols to open the shop.

“She likes to serve the community,” he said. “That’s why we were originally in Lake Worth next to the playhouse on Lake Avenue.”

Echols said over time the store moved away from selling to renting. He added that his store is not for the packaged costume but something much bigger and better.

Theatrics gets its costumes from theaters that are finished with performances and other shops that may have closed down.

“People get into this,” he said. “We had people come in that were going on a Titanic reenactment cruise. We outfitted period costumes for that trip.”

As of now, Theatrics is taking appointments only at 561-623-7026. In the summer, the store will be open five days a week, then seven days a week for September and October’s Halloween season.

An inside look at the Spurs Silver Dancers

Reported by: Alanna Sarabia
WOAI.com
5/25/12

SAN ANTONIO – Practice makes perfect, and that’s exactly how the start their preparation for each Spurs game. The San Antonio Silver Dancers work hard for each and every game, bringing old school, hip-hop, and jazz routines combined with a playlist of different songs they perform to. Click here to watch…

Slideshow: An Inside Peek at the Silver Dancers…

Fan interaction and autograph signings take place before their performances where Spurs fans can feel connected to the team. The Silver Dancers enjoy meeting and greeting the crowd of people who have brought them to where they are today.

“I think this group has gone through what any team or any group goes through – struggles, triumphs. You watch them go through their good times and not so good times. You see them grow as individuals, as women, and as performers,” explained choreographer and coach Raquel Garcia.

Good luck Silver Dancers. Go Spurs Go!

For more information about The San Antonio Silver Dancers, visit spurs.com.

Nets’ new blood

New York Post
May 27, 2012

So you think you can dance? We’re told Tanisha Scott — a dancer and choreographer who’s worked with Jay-Z, Alicia Keys, Rihanna and Sean Paul, and appeared in videos for Ne-Yo and Ludacris — has been chosen to choreograph and guest-judge auditions for the Brooklyn Nets’ dance team. Auditions for the new, Crunch Fitness-sponsored crew will begin Saturday at Long Island University in Brooklyn. Crunch’s Fort Greene location is putting on weekly intensive training sessions for aspiring Nets dancers. The squad will be entertaining fans at the Barclays Center next season. Scott was also choreographer on “Notorious,” the Notorious B.I.G. biopic.

Atlanta Falcons Cheerleaders 101

Former Rally Cat a step closer to being Dallas Cowboy Cheerleader

Working towards her dream
By Will Vandervort
MyOrangeUpdate.com

CLEMSON — It was just another boring night at home for Collin Sarvis. A freshman at J.L. Mann High School at the time, her school work was done, dinner had already been served and it was time to wind down for the evening. So just like any other night, the Greenville, SC native got on the internet — to learn.

Sarvis was not brushing up on literature or trying to figure out an algebraic formula, though math is her favorite subject. Rather, she was studying the art of dancing and trying to learn new ways she could get better at the one thing she loves to do above all else.

“That’s one of my favorite things to do,” the former Clemson Rally Cat said Saturday afternoon. “When I get bored, I go on the internet and watch other routines, routines from other colleges, television shows and other dance teams. It is one way I try to make myself better.”

It was on this night eight years ago that a 14-year-old Sarvis came across a performance by the Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders. Though she had seen the Cowboy Cheerleaders on television countless times, she had never seen them perform a full routine. She was amazed at what she saw.

“I love their showmanship,” she said. “They have so much power and energy. They are so entertaining to watch. As I was watching them, I thought to myself, ‘That’s what I want to look like.’

“You can’t help but love watching them. You can tell they love what they are doing. They are entertainers.”

It was at this point, Sarvis knew what she wanted to do. She did not want to be just a professional cheerleader — she wanted to be a Dallas Cowboy Cheerleader. On May 19, she came one step closer to fulfilling her dream when she was named one of 45 girls to make the Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders Training Camp Squad.

Former Clemson Rally Cat Collin Sarvis, sitting sixth from the left, with the rest of the 44 girls that earned a spot on the Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders Training Camp Squad. Sarvis was one of 24 rookies to make the squad. Photo courtesy Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders

“I have loved them ever since that night in high school,” she said. “Once the (CMT) television show started, I always watched it. From watching the show, that’s when I thought to myself, ‘I can do this. That’s what I want to do.’”

And she is doing it. Sarvis is on the fast track to fulfilling her childhood dream. Just a few weeks after wrapping up her career as a Rally Cat for Clemson University at the National Cheerleading and Dance Competition in Orlando, FL, she boarded a plan to Dallas, TX where she, along with around 400 other girls, dared to dream.

“I told my family and my closest friends that this is what I wanted to do,” Sarvis said. “My mom told me, ‘Once you have a college degree, you can do whatever you want. If you want to try out for an NFL team, you can do that, but you have to have that degree first.’

“From that point on, I always said once I graduate from college this was what I was going to do. When I started at Clemson and became a Rally Cat, I still said it. I wanted to be a Dallas Cowboy Cheerleader.

“Before this year started, my mom looked at me and said, ‘This isn’t just saying it anymore, now it’s a reality. Do you really want this?’ After that conversation, I decided I was going to do it.”

Sarvis’ plans to become a Dallas Cowboy Cheerleader went into full-action mode after talking to her mother, Charlotte. Though she was finishing up her nursing degree and her obligations as a member of the Rally Cats, she started a new workout schedule, changed her diet and began getting
ready for auditions.

She posted pictures of Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders by her computer and in her room to remind herself of what she was striving for. Every day she checked the auditions page of the Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders website, and when the audition application, times and dates were posted, she immediately submitted her application and started a countdown in her daily planner.

“I really did not tell anyone what I was doing,” Sarvis said. “My immediate family knew, the Rally Cats knew and a few of my best friends from high school. But besides that, I did not tell anyone. I got on a flight and I went down there by myself.

“I was determined I was going to do it.”

And so far, she has.

After surviving the preliminary and semifinal rounds in early May, Sarvis flew back to Dallas 11 days later for a formal interview, a test on the Dallas Cowboys and the Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders and then one final performance for the judges. On May 19 — two weeks after tryouts began — Sarvis was named one of 45 girls to make the Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders Training Camp Squad. Her journey to become a full-time member of the Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders will continue over the next eight weeks as she participates in a grueling camp that will test her physically, mentally and as a dancer.

She will be doing all of this while studying for the NCLEX — her nursing license test — and moving to the Dallas/Fort Worth area at the same time.

“They are going to cut nine or ten more of us between now and the day of the team photo shoot,” Sarvis said. “That can happen at any time. I’m going to go down there and give this everything I have and do the best I can. That’s all I can do. This is what I have wanted to do for a very long time, so I’m going to give it all I got.”

Sarvis’ journey will be captured by television cameras as she, along with 21 veterans and 23 other rookies, will have CMT chronicle their stories on Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders: Making the Team 7, which will air in September.

“There have been moments, but I don’t know if it has totally sunk in yet that this is happening,” she said. “I go through so many stages of being excited, and then being stressed and overwhelmed. I realize this is the biggest thing I have ever done, but I’m really excited about what I’m doing.

“I have always dreamed about being a Dallas Cowboy Cheerleader, and now I have an opportunity to achieve that. It has been really crazy these last couple of weeks, but it has been a good crazy. I’m so blessed to be in this situation.”

TCU showgirl is a finalist for Dallas Cowboys cheerleader spot

Mac Engel’s Big Mac Blog

Getting ready to take a break and thought I would leave you with this: TCU Showgirl Jordan Daigle has made it through a series of cuts to earn an invite to the Dallas Cowboys’ cheerleaders training camp. About 400 women roughly began, and now 45 women have made it to this training camp. Daigle joined The Big Mac Blog for a chat back on November 10, 2011:

Name: Jordan Daigle
Major: Broadcast Journalism
Hometown: Plano, Texas
Favorite place to eat in Fort Worth?: Sushi Axiom. Love the Tower of Pisa!
Favorite movie: Wedding Crashers and now Bridesmaids.
Favorite pro sports team: Cowboys, Mavericks, and the Rangers. Typical Texas girl, I suppose.

The Big Mac Blog: Most embarrassing song on your iPod?
Jordan Daigle: Pokemon theme song. I have no idea why it is on there.

Visinsky_TCU-(13)The Big Mac Blog: How long does it take you to get ready for a game?
Jordan Daigle: Well about an hour before game day practice and an hour after practice. So I guess 2 hours in all. I never quite feel completely ready though. There is always something to be touched up!

The Big Mac Blog: How long does it take you to get ready to go out with your friends?
Jordan Daigle: Depends on who you ask, I think I probably take an hour 1/2. However, someone like my boyfriend would probably disagree with that. In his mind I take forever!

The Big Mac Blog: Finish this sentence: Sex and the City is … :
Jordan Daigle: Not my “all time favorite show ever!” Surprisingly, I never got into. I did see the first movie though and was entertained.

The Big Mac Blog: Most embarrassing moment performing?
Jordan Daigle: One time I completely blanked during a halftime performance. I thought that was pretty embarrassing. I just kind of pranced around. I definitely heard one of the girls say “what are you doing?” as she passed me mid dance. Still, not quite sure what I looked like. I’m sure my mom has it on video somewhere.

The Big Mac Blog: Ever been injured performing?
JD: Besides the accidental/usual pom pom smack in the face, no 🙂

The Big Mac Blog: Is TCU joining the Big 12 good, or should it have stayed in the Big East?
Jordan Daigle: DEFINITELY GOOD! I cannot wait to be a fan at those games. Kind of wish I had one more year of Showgirls, but hey I did get to experience the Rose Bowl and the Super Bowl, so I am very fulfilled.

The Big Mac Blog: How do you remain interested, or cheer, in a blowout?
Jordan Daigle: Well haven’t experienced one yet. Or well actually I guess at a few basketball games. I mean it is still entertaining to watch even if we are losing. We are also constantly moving around so games go by relatively fast.

The Big Mac Blog: If a Genie granted you three wishes, what would you wish for?
Jordan Daigle: Well, I would really like to be transported to a beach right now, have a full week of spa treatment, and have an unlimited supply of Betty Crocker funfetti Cupcakes.

Western freshman joins the Seahawks Sea Gals

Kamrin Dishman
Western Front Online
Friday, 25 May 2012

As the song “Turn Me On” by David Guetta began, Western freshman Bianca Baze started the freestyle portion of her audition for the 2012 Sea Gals, the Seattle Seahawks’ cheerleading squad. She didn’t know what the song would be until it started.

After two eight-counts of her prepared routine, her mind blanked. She had to improvise the rest.

Baze said she was contestant number 174 in the semi-finals — the very last dancer to perform in front of a panel of about four judges.

To add even more pressure to the audition, fans could log onto the Seahawks’ website and stream the final audition live.

Baze waited and waited to hear her named called for the new roster.

“I was thinking in my head, ‘I definitely didn’t make it,’” Baze said.

As if auditioning last wasn’t nerve-wracking enough, “Bianca Baze” was also the last named called.

She was officially a Sea Gal.

Baze was humbled by the response from her family and friends after she found out she made the cut. Her Facebook exploded with nice comments and she received many congratulations around campus, she said

“We were elated,” said Sandi Baze, Bianca’s mother. “I thought Bianca nailed it.”

As part of the audition, the contestants had to tell the judges something unique about themselves. Baze talked about her “toe-thumbs,” — she said she has “Megan Fox thumbs.”

“My thumbs are really short and stubby,” Baze said jokingly. “At least one person from each generation of my family has these thumbs.”

It wasn’t as much what they said but how they said it that was important, she said.

She thought the judges wanted to make sure she could be comfortable speaking in front of a crowd. Until that point of the auditions, Baze said she had been shy, so she thought her lighthearted response would show the judges her personality.

A mix of Baze’s extensive dance background and natural stage presence landed her a spot on the Sea Gals after her first audition, Sandi Baze said. Some girls have to try out more than once at the annual auditions before they make it, she said.

Baze has been dancing since she was 3 years old and started dancing competitively at age 4.

Baze briefly played basketball in seventh grade, but Sandi Baze said they were probably happy when she didn’t come back.

“She was a bit of a gazelle,” Sandi Baze said. “She was just prancing down the court.”

It’s not just important to learn the moves and execute them, but the dancers also have to draw the audience in, Sandi Baze said.

“Something happens to Bianca when she goes on stage,” she said. “She executes it with such joy you just want to watch her.”

Baze said the Sea Gals perform mostly jazz, a lot of hitting, or sharp movements, and hair flips.

She has done all kinds of dance — jazz, modern, ballet and hip-hop. She said hip-hop is her favorite, but jazz is a close second.

“It’s kind of sexy stuff, which is fun to do,” Baze said.

Her love for performing goes beyond dance — she spent some of her childhood acting and modeling.

“My dream when I was younger was to be an actress on the Disney channel,” Baze said.

She also performed on Tumwater High School’s competitive dance team in Olympia and was the hip-hop captain her senior year.

Kim Hille, Baze’s high school dance coach, said Baze’s dance skills and the way she presented herself made her seem like she was much older, though she was only a sophomore. Hille said Baze got along with everybody and is a real performer.

“She [did] everything effortlessly,” Hille said. “If she’s on the floor, you can’t help but watch her.”

Hille said she thought Baze could have made the Sea Gals as a sophomore in high school.

Baze willingly went back to her high school dance team this past winter break to step in when a girl on the team couldn’t attend a choreography session, Hille said.

Baze learned a two-minute routine in only two days so the other dancers could learn the routine with the correct formations.

“Thats just the kind of kid she is,” Hille said.

Bianca’s family can’t wait to watch her at Century Link Field where the Seahawks play, Sandi Baze said. Her family is thrilled Baze is an NFL cheeerleader.

“I grew up as a [Green Bay] Packers fan, it’s in my blood,” Sandi Baze said.

Although Sandi Baze grew up in Wisconsin, she said she has made room in her heart for two teams.

“She will always be a Packers fan, but I think she’s a Seahawks fan now too,” Baze said.

The Seahawks home game against the Packers is the day after what would have been Bianca’s late-grandfather’s 89th birthday, which Sandi Baze said will be a special day for her family.

Baze will be commuting to practice in Renton twice a week and has to arrive at the Seahawks games four hours before kick-off on Sundays, she said.

Even with her new busy schedule as a Sea Gal, school will remain a top priority for Baze. She said she is trying to work her class schedule around practice. She is pursuing a degree is business, and she wants to work in the music or fashion industry.

Her spot as a Sea Gal is a paid position. Baze said the money will at least pay for gas for her commute.

“I feel like dance is one of those things that always sticks with you,” Baze said. “I just feel like I have to do it.”