USA Cheerleaders Texas Division Announces 2016 Team Auditions will be January 31st

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The First Year Auditions for the Inaugural Year of the USA Cheerleaders Texas Division

Dallas, Texas— USA Cheerleaders, a national organization committed to supporting the United States military, veterans and their families, will launch the Texas Division with open auditions on Sunday, January 31. This is the inaugural year for the Texas Division, headed by Former Dallas Cowboys cheerleader and NY Jets cheerleader, Jessica Kalil, who cheered for the USA Cheerleaders New York Division before moving to Texas.

The one-day auditions will be held at the Power House of Dance on Inwood Road on Sunday, January 31. The auditions are an opportunity for anyone who meets the requirements (see below) to cheer for the first year USA Cheerleaders Texas Division.

“USA Cheerleaders is an incredible group of women that give back to our service members,” said Kalil. “Not only will the team perform for military, veterans and their families in Texas, they will also assist in fundraising, writing letters and preparing care packages for our heroes.”

The USA Cheerleaders are a dedicated group of professional cheerleaders with steadfast respect for the service men and women, veterans, their families and the United States. USA Cheerleaders honor American heroes, past, present and future with a determined sense of patriotic duty.

ABOUT THE USA CHEERLEADERS TEXAS DIVISION OPEN AUDITIONS

WHAT: One-day audition where candidates will perform a short freestyle dance before learning a dance routine and performing in front of a panel of judges. Visit facebook.com/USACheerleadersTexasDivision for more details.

WHEN: Sunday, January 31, 2015
9:00 AM to 1:00 PM (registration begins at 8:30 AM)

WHERE: Power House of Dance
12300 Inwood Road, Suite 124
Dallas, Texas 75244

REQUIREMENTS:
– Candidates must be 18 years of age by March, 2016
– Dance techniques: Double Turns, High Kicks, Splits,
– Other dance tricks preferred
– Cheer, tumbling, stunting skills a plus

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The Gotham City Cheerleaders

From rehearsing at Redd’s to entertaining fans outside MetLife Stadium, it’s always a fun time when I visit the Gotham City Cheerleaders. Follow them on twitter and help get them inside the stadium.

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Continue reading The Gotham City Cheerleaders

Photo of the Day – September 21

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A Gotham City Cheerleader

Photo of the Day – August 6

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A Gotham City Cheerleader

AllPro 3 Photo of the Day – July 10

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Photo of the Day – April 6

A Gotham City Cheerleader

Registration for The Gotham City Cheerleaders Auditions is Now Open

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[Register here]

Photo of the Day – January 23

A Pair of Gotham City Cheerleaders

A Labor of Unrequited Love

The Gotham City Cheerleaders Perform Outside MetLife Stadium as the Unofficial Squad of the Giants

By Benjamin Norman
New York Times

The Gotham City Cheerleaders have one mission: to become the official cheerleading team of the Giants.

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The team, started in 2011 by a former Washington Redskins cheerleader, Ana De Villegas, operates like any official N.F.L. cheerleading squad: It practices a few times a week, performs at events, has its own uniforms and even produces a swimsuit calendar.

But you will not see these cheerleaders on the sidelines at Giants home games. Instead, they hit the pavement outside MetLife Stadium, performing at tailgate parties in the parking lot with the hope that word of mouth and a growing fan base will persuade the franchise to bring them inside.

The Giants are one of six teams in the N.F.L. without an official cheerleading squad. John Mara, one of the Giants’ owners, has said, “It’s just not part of our philosophy.”

Shortly after forming the cheerleading team, De Villegas reached out to the Giants, but she never got a response. So she decided to build her brand from the ground up.

As the team makes its way around the parking lot, the reactions are mostly favorable. Fans cheer for the women and often join their dance circles. Teenage boys and young female cheerleaders line up for selfies and autographed calendars. The squad frequently, politely, declines invitations for beer and burgers from tailgaters.

However, the women also often hear grumbling about “tradition,” and how the Giants need a new offensive line more than cheerleaders.

They also regularly hear, “Wait, the Giants have cheerleaders?”

To De Villegas, her squad and their fans, the Giants do — just not inside the stadium.


[NYT Slideshow of the GCC]

[Gotham City Cheerleaders]

Photo of the Day – December 11

Gotham City Cheerleader BriAnna

 

The Gotham City Cheerleaders

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The Gotham City Cheerleaders during my visit last month.

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The squad in front of MetLife Stadium

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Striking a pose during pre-game rehearsal at Redd’s

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GCC Braintrust

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Karen is Miss February in the GCC Swimsuit Calendar

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Kaitlyn dancing with  Sibile Marcellus from Fox News

[GCC Gallery]

[Gotham City Cheerleaders]

NY Giants Fans Love The Gotham City Cheerleaders

By Sibile Marcellus
MyFOXPhilly.com

Dancing along Wall Street in New York City you can find Gotham City Cheerleaders practicing their amazing moves. These girls are intense and they mean business both in rehearsal and in the parking lot during Giants games. In their quest to be the Giants cheerleaders, the Gotham City Cheerleaders have rehearsals on Wednesdays and on Saturdays for several hours, as you can see these girls mean business and the Giant fans love them!

Gotham City Cheer-Captain, Bri Anna Barnett, talks a little about what it takes to be a Gotham City Cheerleader.

“We as members of the team, we are always on our toes. Can’t let our fitness slack, because you can always be replaced,” she said.

While the Giants NFL team has never had their own cheerleaders, fan of the Big Blue have nothing bad to say about these ladies.

“You see when the girls show up everyone’s faces light up, all the cameras come out and it’s a different dynamic. It’s excellent. Giants notoriously don’t have cheerleaders. So to have these girls out here in parking lot with us getting the crowd going right before the game is excellent,” one fan said.

The Executive Director of the Gotham City Cheerleaders, Ana De Villegas, wants to make sure that everyone knows the true role of a cheerleader.

“The goal is to be the entertainment for pre-game and halftime shows. People have preconception we want to be on sidelines. That’s not the case,” she said.

Some fans can’t seem to understand why the Giants are the only team without their own official cheerleaders.

“I don’t really understand what the deal is. The Jets have cheerleaders. Everybody has cheerleaders. Everybody loves cheerleaders. I don’t think there are words to explain how hot they are,” one male fan said.

[Gotham City Cheerleaders]

Photo of the Day – October 6

Kaitlyn and BriAnna of the Gotham City Cheerleaders during a break in rehearsal on Sunday.

The Detroit Pride are the Lions’ unofficial cheerleaders

Rah! Rah! Sis Boom Bah!
By Alysa Offman
Metro Times
September 3, 2014

When they got their start five years ago, the Detroit Pride Cheerleaders were kind of a joke. Actually, that’s literally how they started. Andrea Wilamowski was catching a game with her husband and a Lions executive when the idea crossed her mind.

“My husband was a sponsor of the Lions, and we were friends with one of the executives that worked for them and it started out kind of as a little joke,” says Wilamowski. “We sat there and everyone was like ‘Why don’t we have cheerleaders?’ Because it’s really boring, you know, the two-minute warning and the places where you’d normally have entertainment, there’s nothing. So, as a joke, off the cuff, I just said I would start a team.”

So she gathered up some sponsors and struck up some interest and in 2010, she founded the Detroit Pride Cheerleaders. And they were all set to be the Lions’ first official cheer squad.

“This executive had said to me, ‘If you get the team started, you bring it to me and we’ll talk,'” she says. “We got a group of people and businesses interested and really wanting to pursue it, and I went back to the Lions and they said, ‘Oh, my God, this is wonderful, but we’re not ready yet. Maybe next year.'”

Now the team is heading into its fifth year, and they’re still not the Lions’ official squad. That doesn’t hold them back, though, and they aren’t shunned by the franchise in any way. In fact, players act as guest judges during tryouts and often attend the final showdown that takes place at the Fillmore.

“The Lions players appreciate us,” Wilamowski says. “They always have been excellent with us. They encourage us to keep doing what we’re doing and they appreciate the fact that we’re out there helping to support them and the city.”

Wilamowski says the franchise supports them, just not with cash, and it’s an expensive business to run. Just getting the girls into a game at Ford Field costs the team upwards of $4,000.

“We have to rely on sponsors and our calendar and our look book sales to keep the team going,” Wilamowski says. “I didn’t start this team with a ton of cash in the bank because it was something we were doing for fun, but then it turned into something very serious right away. We have all of our different sponsors that we do business with, which is very helpful, but what people don’t realize is that we purchase our tickets when we go into the games.”

Ironically, the girls never sit in the seats those tickets belong to. Instead, they stand on the concourse, shaking hands and taking pictures with fans.

“As soon as the girls walk in, they’re smiling for three solid hours,” Wilamowski says. “They stand in three-and-a-half inch boots from 10:30 in the morning to 5:30 at night. We go on the concourse and lines form immediately. We separate the girls into different groups, and we put them in different places because if all of the girls stand in one place, there’s a massive line that forms all the way down the concourse.”

Sure, they get their share of creepy drunks who go for boob-grabs and upskirts, but more often than not, their biggest fans are too young to even contemplate such crudeness.

“I think that the biggest reward is when you see the little girls that are 4 to 10 years old, and the girls will hand them a pom-pom and take a picture and the look on their faces is amazing,” Wilamowski says. “To them, these cheerleaders are, with all their rhinestones and sparkles and their shiny poms, they’re a hero, they’re a princess. It’s a really rewarding moment.”

Felicia Kollias is entering into her second year as a Detroit Pride Cheerleader and meeting with those miniature fans is one of her biggest rewards. She gushes about those fan interactions, noting it was the biggest surprise of getting to be part of the Detroit Pride.

Kollias works as a receptionist at a hair salon and goes to school full-time for teaching. Cheering with the Detroit Pride takes up a considerable amount of her time, but to her it’s worth it.

“We perform outside for every home game,” she says. “We don’t just cheer. We do dances with the crowd, and there is lots of interaction. Rain or shine, we’re outside performing. Because we aren’t official cheerleaders, we’re able to have more interactions with fans.”

Being able to interact with fans is one reason Wilamowski likes the Pride’s independence.

“It takes a lot to put together a sanctioned team, and those teams spend most of their time performing,” she says. “Eighty percent of our time is spent on fan interaction, and 20 percent is spent performing. If we were to become an official team, it would be the opposite. Now we’re able to pick the charities we work with and the events we do; there’s a lot less red tape.”

Doing charity work is a big part of being a Pride cheerleader. In fact, they’re required to make philanthropic appearances and attend community events.

“The girls have a certain amount of charitable appearances that they have to do every year,” Wilamowski says. “They do not get paid for them. And they also do four or five community appearances that they have to do a year, and then after that they have the potential for paid opportunities, and we do a lot of appearances throughout the year, not only on game days but on off days, too,” she says.

While their schedule wasn’t solidified at press time, you can usually find the Pride cheerleaders inside Ford Field during games, but you won’t see them there during Monday Night Football due to the high cost of tickets. During that game, they’ll perform at halftime at the Fillmore at a special viewing party. Aside from that, fans can keep up with them on Facebook and their official website. — mt

The 2014-2015 GCC Football Calendar Premieres September 6, 2014

The GCC are unveiling their 2nd annual Football Calendar right in time for the NFL regular season kick-off with a dance-themed style that is a first of its kind in sports entertainment.

Featured as one of the hottest calendars of 2013-2014 by The New York Post and Pix Channel 11, the 2014 publication promises to exceed the high standards of its predecessor with inspiring dance photographs and features of the cheerleaders in their various careers outside of dance.

Bar Anticipation is hosting this exciting event at their renowned Grotto Beach, equipped with sandy bar areas, cabanas and the famous waterfall pool from where guests can watch the show afloat.

Guests will enjoy a dinner buffet, open bar and “meet and greets” with the GCC and surprise celebrity guests.

[More info and tickets]